A Level Economics

AQA A LEVEL ECONOMICS 

Economics is highly rated by Oxbridge and Russell Group universities as one of the more academically challenging social sciences.  As it is a subject unique in its field, it deserves the attentions of students who wish to be challenged with rigorous and complicated materials.  

 

Economics requires a great deal of further reading for students.  Regular examination of business news, market information and  economic-related blogs will help increase the chances of getting the most out of the subject. The most important skill in economics is being able to evaluate the impact of policy on the macro and microeconomic environment, and therefore an interest in the political world can also help in this topic.  There are a wide range of resources available such as ‘The Economist’, ‘The Financial Times’ and other online materials and economic blogs including the BBC and other media sites. 

Topics Covered 

The topics that are covered at A Level are split into micro and macro economic topics. They include:   

 

The operation of markets and market failure (microeconomics) 

• economic methodology and the economic problem 

• price determination in a competitive market 

• competitive and concentrated markets 

• the market mechanism, market failure and government intervention  in markets. 

 

The national economy (macroeconomics) 

• the measurement of macroeconomic performance 

• how the macro economy works, including the circular flow of income,  AD/AS analysis, and related concepts 

• economic performance 

• macroeconomic policy. 

Assessment 

AQA A Level Economics is assessed via three separate examinations as detailed below. Each examination is worth exactly one third of the overall A Level mark. All three papers will be sat at the end of the two year course. 

 

Paper 1: Markets and market failure: students answer two questions 

Section A – students choose one context from a choice of two;  

Section B – students choose one context from a choice of three. 

 

Paper 2: National and international economy: students answer two questions 

Section A – students choose one context from a choice of two;  

Section B - students choose one context from a choice of three. 

 

Paper 3: Economic principles and issues:  

Section A – 30 multiple choice questions;  

Section B – extended writing questions.