HTGFS Curriculum Overview

 

At Hatcham Temple Grove Free School, we believe that a broad balanced and academically rigorous curriculum is essential for our students to achieve the very highest standards. We ensure that we meet all aspects of the current national curriculum and further enrich this with trips, workshops, events and celebrations. In English and Maths we ensure that students quickly grasp the fundamentals and build a love and fluency within the subjects. Children are explicitly taught phonics from reception, while a strong emphasis is placed on arithmetic in the younger years. As children move through the school we build on these foundations to ensure children are able to solve problems, ask questions and draw inferences, as well as right fluently and confidently in a range of genres.

 

We place a strong emphasis on Language learning, with students learning German from Year 1 up. Children are regularly taught by fluent German speakers who not only teach the subject discreetly but also enrich the wider curriculum through cultural events and immersive experiences. Music and performance are central to the curriculum with all students getting the opportunity to learn to play and instrument by the end of Key Stage 2, with subject specialists increasingly delivering the music curriculum as children move through the school. Science is given a prominent place within the curriculum to ensure children acquire the body of knowledge appropriate to understand the world around them and ask questions about our understanding of the world.

 

We place a strong emphasis on Language learning, with students learning German from Year 1 up. Children are regularly taught by fluent German speakers who not only teach the subject discreetly but also enrich the wider curriculum through cultural events and immersive experiences. Music and performance are central to the curriculum with all students getting the opportunity to learn to play and instrument by the end of Key Stage 2, with subject specialists increasingly delivering the music curriculum as children move through the school. Science is given a prominent place within the curriculum to ensure children acquire the body of knowledge appropriate to understand the world around them and ask questions about our understanding of the world.

 

Reading and writing are taught through guided reading and guided writing sessions alongside daily phonics and supported by a structured reading scheme. Phonics is taught formally using the Letters and Sounds scheme. Children are assessed throughout their time in the foundation stage through observations, conversations and photographs. At the start of the Reception year every child will be assessed. This is known as a baseline assessment. Parents, staff and the children themselves all contribute to the assessment process.

 

On leaving reception children will progress through Key stage 1 (Year 1 and 2) and into Key Stage 2 (Years 3 -6). Throughout this time children will be regularly assessed and work adapted to ensure we provide students with the most relevant, engaging and academically stretching curriculum possible, which will engender a lasting love for learning.

Early Years Foundation Stage

When children first arrive at the school in reception they will begin their learning on the Early Years Foundation Stage Curriculum. The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) is the stage of education for children from birth to the end of the Reception year. It is based on the recognition that children learn best through play and active learning. The EYFS has four themes.

 

These are:

1. A unique child

2. Positive relationships

3. Enabling environments

4. Learning and development

 

Within the theme of learning and development there are seven areas. There are three prime areas and four specific areas. The prime areas develop quickly in

response to relationships and experiences, and run through and support learning in all other areas.

 

The prime areas are fundamental throughout the EYFS. The three prime areas are:

 

• Personal, social and emotional development

• Physical development

• Communication and Language

 

The specific areas include essential skills and knowledge. They grow out of the prime areas, and provide important contexts for learning. The four specific areas are:

 

• Literacy

• Mathematics

• Understanding the world

• Expressive Arts and Design

 

Key Stage 1- Year 1 and 2

The children in KS1 follow the National Curriculum subjects as well as Personal, Social, Health education (including Sex and Relationship Education) with Citizenship. The transition from reception to year 1 is dealt with sensitively, especially in the first term where year 1 children learn through play and have daily access to outside activities which continues to use the principles of the EYFS to develop the child’s learning and social development.

 

Year 1 teachers use the FSP to build an accurate picture of children’s learning and progress and then move on to the Federation assessment levels, linked to the end of year national learning goals. All learning and teaching in KS1 is based on termly themes taken from the International Primary Curriculum.  This allows children to explore subject knowledge across a range of areas, such as art, geography science and history through an overarching topic.

 

English and mathematics are taught daily and children also receive daily guided reading sessions and phonics in year 1 and 2.

 

Reading, writing, speaking and listening continues to be taught through the use of synthetic phonics (letters and sounds) and supported by a structured reading scheme (Oxford Reading Tree and Rigby Star). Children who are gifted and talented and those with additional educational needs (AEN) are identified and interventions put in place to help address their needs. Children needing further encouragement and support also may work in small groups with our team of learning support assistants (LSAs).

 

At the end of KS1 the children are assessed to report their National Curriculum attainment levels in reading, grammar, spelling and punctuation, writing, mathematics and science. 

 

German is taught by fluent speakers several times per week, with opportunities built into the curriculum so it is as immersive as possible.

 

Specialist music teachers deliver music to all classes on a weekly basis, with a focus on developing choral and basic key skills in Key Stage 1, which will support the learning of instruments throughout Key Stage 2.

 

Key Stage 2 - Years 3-6

Our Key Stage 2 curriculum is both flexible and broad, we provide practical experiences for our pupils and make links with previous learning to really enable every child to be the best learner that they can possibly be. The children continue to follow the National Curriculum subjects as well as Personal, Social, Health Education (including Sex and Relationship Education) with citizenship otherwise known as PSHCE.

 

All learning and teaching in KS2 is based on termly themes taken from the International Primary Curriculum (IPC).  This allows children to explore subject knowledge across a range of areas, such as Art, Geography, Science and History through an overarching topic. English and Mathematics are taught daily and children also receive daily guided reading sessions, handwriting practise and spelling, punctuation and grammar (GPS). All children receive weekly spellings and are tested at the end week. All our pupils have a login for Mathletics and are encouraged to use this both in school and at home.

 

At the end of KS2 the children are assessed to report their National Curriculum age attainment levels in reading, grammar, spelling and punctuation, writing, mathematics and science. We have specialist music teachers who deliver music to all classes on a weekly basis, including strings, Clarinet and recorder throughout Key Stage 2. Individual lesson are also offered by peripatetic teachers. Our children have weekly PE lessons of which many are taught by specialist teachers. Our KS2 pupils continue to have German taught to them by fluent speakers regularly each week, with other opportunities built into the curriculum so that it continues to be as immersive as possible.